Tuesday, February 18, 2014

JOHN BIELSS -- Artist

John Bielss is a painter who is also a member of the Taylor Artist Guild.  Journeying to Sedona was inspirational to him as an artist, and since then, he's completed several paintings and drawings inspired by the trip.

John will be showing his work in the upcoming SEDONA: On the Rocks, Please! exhibit here in downtown Taylor, Texas.

In particular, John was inspired by a memorial to three people who died in a Sweat Lodge incident in 2009 at the Angel Valley Spiritual Center.

Site of the Sweat Lodge Memorial
 The painting is of Oak Creek, which runs less than 50-yards behind the memorial.

Oak Creek by John Bielss

To see a few more of John's paintings, please visit the Taylor Artist Guild website.

Monday, February 17, 2014

Judy Blundell SEDONA Inspiration

Judy Blundell, Taylor Artist Guild member, will also have some artwork in the upcoming
SEDONA: A Visual Exploration of a Westbound Adventure exhibit coming up on February 20th at Atelier95 in downtown Taylor, Texas. 

Atelier 95 is at 311 N. Main Street, Taylor, Texas.  The show will be from 5 - 9 p.m.

This is what Judy had to say about her inspiration for her artwork she'll have in the show:

"The custom of stacking rocks reflects man's desire to re-create the majesty of nature herself.  Some of the stacks we found on our treks through the Sedona formations were dedicated to loved ones, friends lost, or memories honored and some some simply a grateful testament and reaction  to the beauty of nature. Personally, I am overwhelmed by the confluence of history, memory, hope and appreciation conveyed in the simple stacking of stones."

Drawing by Judy Blundell

Painting by Judy Blundell

For more about Judy and her art, please visit the TAG website.

BECKY COE NELSON--Featured Artist

Becky Coe Nelson is another of the Taylor Artist Guild members who was able to travel to SEDONA and who will have artwork in the SEDONA: A Visual Exploration of a Westbound Adventure exhibit coming up on February 20th at Atelier95 in downtown Taylor, Texas.


Becky Coe Nelson, Sketching.  Photo by Paula Engelhardt.
Here are a few words from Becky about the experience:

The Sedona retreat was something I had been looking forward to with anticipation of great things, and it met and exceeded my expectations.



Those of us who have "day jobs" get onto our little beaten paths, and often into a rut that is uninspiring at best. I spent much of my childhood outdoors, exploring, enjoying the connection I felt with the wild creatures and nature. The more I learned about the fascinating hidden world of the insects, snakes, and endless variety of living things, the more I realized that the reasons to fear them are few. 

Becky's new friend, a walking stick
 There was a peaceful river just a short walk from the cabin where we were staying. I would wake up before the sun was up, walk down the hill and sit on the footbridge, just to watch the sunrise and listen to the water flowing. The air was so clean and fresh. There were many places to explore, each view rivaling another in its beauty. As I relaxed and took it all in, I felt reconnected with the child explorer that I was long ago, what I am and have always been, the artist I was born to be.

Woodcarving by Becky Coe Nelson
 For more information about Becky, please visit the Taylor Artist Guild website.

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Coming up on February 20 in downtown Taylor, Texas


Please join us for our first art exhibit of the year.  See artwork that was inspired by an artist's retreat to Sedona, AZ.  From photographs, to paintings to wood carvings, please join us for a night of inspiration from local artists Becky Coe Nelson, John Biells, Judy Blundell, Paula Englehardt, Jan Konarik.

From 6-9 p.m. at Atelier 95, 311 N. Main Street, Taylor, Texas.  

Here's just some of the artwork you'll see:

Sedona Red Rock by Ace Tobak.  Photograph.
Drawing by Judy Blundell

Hand-carved and painted Arizona Ridge-Nosed Rattler, by Becky Coe Nelson.  The Arizona State Reptile, endangered and not frequently seen.


 
 Linoleum block print by Paula Englehardt.